Big Tent Needs a Stake Holder

A Big TentThe new Diversity Chairman for the state GOP has gotten here none too soon.

Politico reports, “As George W. Bush winds down his presidency, Republicans are now on the verge of going six — and probably more — years without an African-American governor, senator or House member.” They are “heading into the 2008 election without a single minority candidate with a plausible chance of winning a campaign for the House, the Senate or governor.”

Former RNC Chair Ken Mehlman particularly pushed for a “big tent” GOP that can accommodate more diversity, but when George W. Bush becomes the first President since Hoover to go an entire term without meeting with the NAACP, then it supports the observation of former Oklahoma Rep. J. C. Watts that while Ken Mehlman’s efforts were appreciated, “I knew that wouldn’t last — that was one person. I’ve never gotten the impression that it was institutionalized.” Watts is one of only four black Republicans to be elected to Congress since Reconstruction.

Is there a Republican elected at any level in Alabama that is African-American or Hispanic?

42 comments to Big Tent Needs a Stake Holder

  • Anonymous

    Danny, PSC candidate Matt Chancey actually attacked the state GOP in print for appointing a diveristy director.

  • Southern Strategy

    Why join a party whose birth in your neck of the woods was spawned by hatred of your kind, and their rights?

  • alabama

    Johnny Ford from Tuskegee switched to the GOP some time ago then resigned from the legislture to run for mayor of his city but I don’t know where he went or if he won.

  • Anonymous

    Johnny won. I just don’t know if he is a Republican now or not.

  • PoliticalJunkie

    Southern Strategy, a few questions for you:
    Which party defended secession and states rights? Which party had a wing dedicated almost exclusively to segregation? Give you a hint, the wing was called the DixieCRATS. Which party’s majority in the US House and Senate voted against the Civil Rights Act? Which party dominated southern politics from the late 18th century until the very end of the 20th century?
    Which party defended the rights of all men and women to be treated equally at the onset of the Civil War? To which party did the president who issued the emancipation proclamation belong? Which party couldn’t get elected to any offices anywhere in the south until the last decade or so?
    If you answered “Democrat” to the questions of the first paragraph and “Republican” to the questions of the second, you’re correct.
    The Republican Party has a lot of work to do in the area of racial reconciliation, but at least the last president from that party hasn’t spent the last several months talking about how Obama only gets votes because he’s black.
    Unfortunately, it is the Democratic party that has it’s roots in racism, but has made strides to move past that era while the Republican party has not made the same efforts.

  • Margaret

    I once worked with a black lady who was a Republican. In fact, her husband ran for office a couple of times as a Republican. I have never seen anyone treated so wretchedly as she was by her black colleagues. They nearly hissed at her every time she walked by. The treatment was so intolerable that she quit and took a job at a juvenile prison. She said the environment was much less stressful there. The Republican party probably has not done enough to draw in minorities. But seeing what my co-worker went through, I determined that part of the reason blacks don’t enter the Republican party is they become pariahs among their neighbors.

  • Fo-fiver

    PoliticalJunkie, are you honestly making the argument that the modern Republican Party is still the party of Lincoln? Could it be that the reason the Republican party has not made an effort towards racial inclusion is because it is now the home of the same individuals and ideology that once comprised the ultra-conservative element of the Southern Democratic Party. Southern Strategy hit the nail on the head.

  • walt moffett

    The Hispanic voting bloc is so small and dispersed, doubt there would be any in office as a R or D.

  • PoliticalJunkie

    Nope, definitely not saying that. In fact, I’m saying exactly what I said: to say that the Republican Party has its roots in racism is to be painfully ignorant or willfully deceptive.
    A fact you explicitly acknowledge in your reply when you contrasted the Republican party of the past with the party of the present and admitted that the racist party of the past was the Democrats.
    I acknowledged the problems of the current party; let’s deal with those instead of making spurious statements about the past.

  • Southern Strategy

    The Republican Party in THE SOUTH surely has its roots in racist policies.

    The Southern Dems switched over. I quote a friend of mine “Nothing Ronald Reagan ever said wasn’t said first by a Southern Democrat.”

  • Tobie

    So, the party brought someone over from Mississippi? Their idea of diversity was to put young African-American Nick Lott on the ballot for state Senate and then do everything in the party’s power to support his white opponent.

    I am sure this Diversity Chair is nothing more than a smoke screen.

  • Will

    Well, Southern Strategy, if your friend said it, it must be true.

    As a matter of fact, the Republican Party in THE SOUTH does not have it roots in racist policies. Following the Civil War, the Republican Party, even in the South, was the party of African Americans and those who had ill feelings towards the Confederacy. Neo-Confederates may label it the party of “carpet baggers,” but that is just another way of saying that those who had opposed the Civil War in the South were Republicans.

    If one looks to history, it was Democrats in the South who were opposed to Northern states utilizing states’ rights before the Civil War. Before the war, Northern states passed state laws that prevented any state governmental official from aiding in the recapture of runaway slaves as proscribed by the Fugitive Slave Act. The secession ordinances ratified by Southern states actually decry this infringement on federal authority.

    Hmm. That doesn’t seem to mesh, you may say? Don’t forget that, following the war, there was a concerted effort by the defeated Confederates to rewrite the reasons for going to war. Instead of anger at the North for ignoring federal legislation, it became a battle to protect the rights of Confederate states. The right to do what, you may ask? That answer is quite obvious, though do not expect to hear it from the pages of “Southern Partisan.” Regardless, following the Civil War, the Republican Party in the South sought to remove impediments that precluded African Americans from both civil protection and civil rights. These efforts were admittedly aided by the disqualification of many Democrats from playing a role in politics, as their involvement in the War disqualified them. The rise of African American rights, a result of Republican efforts mind you, caused a great deal of consternation on the part of the Democrats, who would get their revenge.

    Following the end of Reconstruction, and the restoration of the Bourbon Democrats, African Americans and Republicans were disenfranchised from political involvement in order to prevent a loss of power similar to that which had occurred during Reconstruction. That 1901 Constitution that so many decry? A Democratic idea to remove both African Americans and poor whites, the base of the Republican Party during Reconstruction, from the voting rolls.

    There can be no denying the racial polarization between the two parties today. That said, anyone who claims the Republican Party, either Northern or Southern, has it roots in racist policies has not studied history.

  • JD

    Republican Jefferson County District Judge who is also black has been elected several times as a Republican

  • JD

    Republican Shelby County Commissioner is also black

  • Reactionary

    Chris Stuckey is a GOP primary candidate for the Madison County Commission District 1 (vs Bob Long – the winner faces incumbent Dem Roger Jones). In keeping with the topic, I’ll note that Stuckey is black.

  • Reactionary

    Will – good post, thanks. I’ll add that the KKK was the terrorist wing of the Democratic Party.

  • Southern Strategy

    The next thing I learn about history on this board will be the first.

    Do you have any clue where this moniker comes from? Any idea who Richard Milhouse Nixon is?

    We can talk pre-history from now until we are blue in the face, but let’s talk the rise of the modern Republican South, and you try to tell me it has nothing to do with racism.

  • Fo-fiver

    Southern Strategy, Do you think any of these folks have read Dan Carter’s book?

  • Will

    Yes, Southern Strategy, I am quite aware of the derivation of your screen name. I am also quite aware, as I am sure you are, that Nixon’s Southern Strategy was merely a copy of George Wallace’s strategy, a fact Nixon did not deny.

    What I am unaware of, however, is how the foundation of the Republican Party is “pre-history.” You yourself referred to the “birth” of the Republican Party in the South, which occurred in 1865, not 1968 as you seem to imply. I do not blame you for tailoring your history to fit your premise. That said, though, one cannot talk about the birth of the Republican Party in the South and ignore the 100 years following its birth.

    Just remember, you can attack Nixon’s Southern Strategy all you want. I will join you in denouncing it, in fact, just as Ken Mehlman did as Chairman of the Republican National Committee. Just do not forget that Nixon was merely employing the tactics of George Wallace, a man whose segregationist past was so virulent and hateful that the Democratic Party nominated him to be Governor four times.

  • Anonymous

    I think a Judge in Bessemer is a back republican–Fanin?

  • JD

    Republican Bessemer Judge is Eric Fancher.

  • Anonymous

    To add to #14, the Black Republican County Commissioner in Shelby County is Earl Cunningham. He has also been Vice-Chairman of the Shelby County Republican Party for the last 5 years.

  • Mr. Coot

    Democrat Blacks will never trust any republican white person. Why? because white people wont shut up and be quiet at the country club. Blacks work like snakes and whites work like birds. All different birds may eat of the same field, but roost separately, yet all fear the snake.

  • bhmhomboy

    Dear Margaret,
    The reason blacks don’t “enter the Republican party” is because of whites like you.

  • Margaret

    Thanks, Bhmhomboy. I am not a member of the Republican party. But if I were, what exactly about me drives them away? Since you know soooo much about me, I hope you can accurately answer that question. BTW, I did not make up that story in post 6. I watched the way that lady was treated everyday for a year.

  • Margaret

    I should add that I am a bit shocked at your rude remark.

  • bhmhomeboy

    This is another reason why blacks don’t “enter the Republican party” Margaret:

    Democrat Blacks will never trust any republican white person. Why? because white people wont shut up and be quiet at the country club. Blacks work like snakes and whites work like birds. All different birds may eat of the same field, but roost separately, yet all fear the snake.

    Comment by Mr. Coot — May 21, 2008 @ 9:08 pm

  • Margaret

    You didn’t answer my question.

  • bhmhomeboy

    J.C. Watts’ father said,

    “A black man voting for Republicans, is like a chicken voting for Colonel Sanders”

  • Margaret

    You still didn’t answer my question. I guess I shouldn’t be surprised.

  • bhmhomboy

    Margaret,
    I don’t know anything about you personally (how could I?) however, your post regarding the so called black Republican woman, and others you make are an indication of your point of view. You may not be a member of the Republican party but you certainly share the same point of view.

    You said:
    But seeing what my co-worker went through, I determined that part of the reason blacks don’t enter the Republican party is they become pariahs among their neighbors.

    If the woman was being “hissed at” (BTW, black folks don’t hiss, snakes hiss, ask Mr. Coot) how do you know it was because she was a Republican? Maybe it was because of the way she treated them.

    I hope this answers your question. I apologize if my post offended you.

  • Margaret

    Oh, It’s ok. I figured you weren’t really thinking. Also, You will notice, I put they “nearly hissed.” (If you spend much time with women, you will notice that some do hiss pretty often.) I am pretty certain of the source of the animosity as ours was a small work place and we knew a lot about each other and were for the most part a very friendly crowd. I never saw anyone treated as she was treated. She too thought her political leanings were the reason for her mistreatment.

    Anyway, do you think, that someone who calls himself Mr. Coot expects anyone to take him seriously?

  • Margaret

    First, why do you say “so called black Republican woman?” Do you think I am lying?
    2nd, all people hiss, they also bark, roar, and squeek. It’s called figurative language. It was not a racist remark.
    She too thought her political party was the reason she was treated so poorly. We were a small and fairly friendly crowd so her treatment stuck out pretty badly.
    Finally, feel free to retract your statement that I would run someone off regardless of the party or the persons race.

  • Margaret

    Sorry about the 2 posts. I didn’t think the first one posted, so I revised.

  • bhmhomeboy@aol.com

    I repeat:

    J.C. Watts’ father said,

    “A black man voting for Republicans, is like a chicken voting for Colonel Sanders”

    End of subject for me.

  • Margaret

    Pretty lame.

  • Margaret

    I guess I should have said I am pretty disappointed. Can you never answer a direct question? It’s not as if I ask you the meaning of life. I got the quote from Watts’ father the first time. My post #33 had 4 separate subjects, you ignored them all. The quote has nothing to do with any of them. Then to avoid any real thought or discussion you add “End of subject for me.” I guess I’ll repeat myself now, pretty lame.

  • bhmhomeboy@aol.com

    Margaret,
    You gave your opinion of why blacks “don’t enter the Republican party” and I gave mine. Let’s leave it at that.

    The purpose of the quote was to show you why African Americans were “hissing” at your black Republican co-worker.

    Sorry if my response “disappointed” you. I’m also sorry you feel the need to resort to calling me “lame” because you don’t like my response. It’s typical of the GOP to resort to name calling, personal attacks and insults when the substance of their arguments fail.

  • Margaret

    Now that you have lectured me about personal attacks, I will refer you to your post #24.

  • bhmhomeboy@aol.com

    Touche Maragret.

  • Margaret

    Yeah, I had a chuckle over that one. It was just too easy.

  • bhmhomboy

    J.C. Watts’ father said,

    “A black man voting for Republicans, is like a chicken voting for Colonel Sanders”

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